Revising the machine smoking regime for cigarette emissions: implications for tobacco control policy

Authors David Hammond, Friedrich Wiebel, Lynn T Kozlowski, Ron Borland, K Michael Cummings, Richard
J O’Connor, Ann McNeill, Greg N Connolly, Deborah Arnott, Geoffrey T Fong
Date Accepted 17 August 2006
Publication Link  Tob Control. 2007; 16(1): 8–14.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2598458/?tool=pmcentrez&ren=
Research Category  Cigarette emissions, policy
Country Canada, USA
Citation  Hammond, D., Wiebel, F., Kozlowski, L. T., Borland, R., Cummings, K. M., O’Connor, R. J., et
al. (2007). Revising the machine smoking regime for cigarette emissions: Implications for
tobacco control policy. Tobacco Control, 16(1), 8-14. Retrieved July 27, 2010, from
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2598458&tool=pmcentrez&ren
dertype=abstract.
PDF  Link
Abstract Background: The WHO Framework Convenion on Tobacco Control includes provisions for testing and
regulating cigarette emissions. However, the current international standard for generating cigarette
emissions—the ISO machine smoking regime—is widely acknowledged to be inappropriate for purposes
of setting regulatory restrictions.
Objective: To review alternatives to the ISO machine smoking regime and the extent to which they: 1)
Represent human smoking behaviour, 2) Reduce the potential for industry exploitation, particularly in the
area of risk communication, and 3) Serve as suitable measures for product regulation.
Methods: Emissions data from 238 Canadian cigarette brands tested under the ISO and ‘‘Canadian Intense’’
machine smoking regimes.
Results: None of the alternative smoking regimes, including the Canadian Intense method, are more
‘‘representative’’ of human smoking behaviour and none provide better predictors of human exposure.
Conclusions: Given that alternatives such as the Canadian Intense regime are subject to the same
fundamental limitations as the ISO regime, key questions need to be addressed before any smoking regime
should be used to set regulatory limits on smoke emissions. In the meantime, regulators should remove
quantitative emission values from cigarette packages and more work should be done on alternative machine
smoking methods.

Posted on August 10, 2006, in Arnott Deborah - Papers, Borland, Ron Papers, Connolly, G. - Papers, Cummings, K M - Papers, Fong, Geoffrey papers, Hammond, David Papers, Kozlowski, L.T. - Papers, McNeill, Ann - Papers, O'Connor, R. Papers, Policy, Project design - Research, Recent peer reviewed papers, Uncategorized, Wiebel, F - Papers. Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on Revising the machine smoking regime for cigarette emissions: implications for tobacco control policy.

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