Building the evidence base for effective tobacco control policies: the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (the ITC Project).

Authors  G T Fong, A Hyland, R Borland, D Hammond, G Hastings, A McNeill, S Anderson, K M Cummings, S Allwright, M Mulcahy, F Howell, L Clancy, M E Thompson, G Connolly, P Driezen
Date  April 1, 2006
Publication Link http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/15/suppl_3/iii51.full.pdf

Publication Link

Research Category Policies, smokefree
Country  Ireland
Citation  Citation: Fong, G. T., Cummings, K. M., & Shopland, D. R. (2008). Building the evidence base for effective tobacco control policies: the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (the ITC Project). Tobacco Control, 15 Suppl 3, iii1-2. Retrieved July 27, 2010,
from
PDF  pdf
Abstract  Objective: To evaluate the psychosocial and behavioural impact of the first ever national level comprehensive workplace smoke-free law, implemented in Ireland in March 2004.
Design: Quasi-experimental prospective cohort survey: parallel cohort telephone surveys of national representative samples of adult smokers in Ireland (n = 769) and the UK (n = 416), surveyed before the law (December 2003 to January 2004) and 8–9 months after the law (December 2004 to January 2005). Main outcome measures: Respondents’ reports of smoking in key public venues, support for total bans in those key venues, and behavioural changes due to the law.
Results: The Irish law led to dramatic declines in reported smoking in all venues, including workplaces (62% to 14%), restaurants (85% to 3%), and bars/pubs (98% to 5%). Support for total bans among Irish smokers increased in all venues, including workplaces (43% to 67%), restaurants (45% to 77%), and bars/ pubs (13% to 46%). Overall, 83% of Irish smokers reported that the smoke-free law was a ‘‘good’’ or ‘‘very good’’ thing. The proportion of Irish homes with smoking bans also increased. Approximately 46% of Irish smokers reported that the law had made them more likely to quit. Among Irish smokers who had quit at post-legislation, 80% reported that the law had helped them quit and 88% reported that the law helped them stay quit.
Conclusion: The Ireland smoke-free law stands as a positive example of how a population-level policy intervention can achieve its public health goals while achieving a high level of acceptance among smokers. These findings support initiatives in many countries toward implementing smoke-free legislation, particularly those who have ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which calls for legislation to reduce tobacco smoke pollution.

Posted on April 1, 2006, in Allwright, M. - Papers, Anderson, S - Papers, Borland, Ron Papers, Clancy, L. - Papers, Connolly, G. - Papers, Cummings, K M - Papers, Driezen, P. - Paper, Fong, Geoffrey papers, Hammond, David Papers, Hastings, Gerard Papers, Howell, Hyland, Andrew Papers, Ireland, McNeill, Ann - Papers, Mulcahy, F. - Paper, Policy, Recent peer reviewed papers, Smokefree - Research, Thompson, M. E. - Papers, United Kingdom and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on Building the evidence base for effective tobacco control policies: the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (the ITC Project)..

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